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. Public Schools of North Carolina . . State Board of Education . . Department Of Public Instruction .

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION
PROGRAMS OF STUDY

The agricultural education program is built on the three core areas of classroom/laboratory instruction, supervised agricultural experience programs and FFA student organization activities/opportunities. The program is designed for delivery through these three components as follows:

  • Classroom/Laboratory Instruction – quality instruction in and about agriculture that utilizes a "learning by doing" philosophy.
  • Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs – all students are expected to have an agriculturally related work-based learning experience while enrolled in agricultural education courses.
  • FFA Student Organization activities/opportunities – FFA activities are an integral part of the agricultural education program that all agricultural education students should participate in if they are to fully benefit from their enrollment in the program.

A quality agricultural education program has a balanced utilization of these three core components. These components are best carried out when the following strategies are employed:

  • Community-Based Planning – involvement of the school administration and community in the planning and coordination of the program is essential to success.
  • Professional Development – agriculture teachers take advantage of opportunities for professional development and growth.
  • Partnerships – the development of alliances with community and business leaders is essential for program success.
  • Marketing – every agricultural education program needs a successful marketing strategy in place to attract and retain students and the support of the community that is being served.

When these components and strategies are in place, program success will occur.

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Agribusiness Management Trends & Issues I
Course Number: 6911
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 25
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Under development (pdf, 40kb)
Prerequisite: None
Description:
This course focuses on management decision making by food, fiber, horticulture, and forestry agribusinesses. Emphasis is placed on current agribusiness topics such as information utilization, strategic planning, organization structures, competitor intelligence, pricing, crisis management, ethics, and human resource management. Additionally, the course infuses current agricultural trends and issues throughout to set an agriculturally related context. English language arts and mathematics are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, job shadowing, and supervised agricultural experience. FFA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Agribusiness Management Trends & Issues II
Course Number: 6912
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 25
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Under development
Prerequisite: Agribusiness Management Trends & Issues I
Description:
This course focuses on management decision making by food, fiber, horticulture, and forestry agribusinesses. Emphasis is placed on creating marketing plans for agricultural industries, human relations and ethics, environmental and labor relations that affect agriculture, income and estate taxation, and understanding government agriculture programs. Additionally, the course infuses current agricultural trends and issues throughout to set an agriculturally related context. English language arts and mathematics are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, job shadowing, and supervised agricultural experience. FFA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Agricultural Mechanics I
Course Number: 6831
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 20
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-180
Course blueprint: Winter 2004 (pdf, 599kb)
Prerequisite: None
Description:
This course develops knowledge and technical skills in the broad field of agricultural machinery, equipment, and structures. The primary purpose of this course is to prepare students to handle the day-to-day problems and repair needs they will encounter in their chosen agricultural career. Topics include agricultural mechanics safety, agricultural engineering career opportunities, hand/power tool use and selection, electrical wiring, basic metal working, basic agricultural construction skills related to plumbing, concrete, carpentry, basic welding, and leadership development. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, job shadowing, and supervised agricultural experience. FFA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Agricultural Mechanics II
Course Number: 6832
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 20
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-180
Course blueprint: Summer 2005 (pdf, 128kb)
Prerequisite: Agricultural Mechanics I
Description:
In this course, the topics of instruction emphasized are non-metallic agricultural fabrication techniques, metal fabrication technology, safe tool and equipment use, human resource development, hot/cold metal working skills and technology, advanced welding and metal cutting skills, working with plastics, and advanced career exploration/decision making. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course are apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, job shadowing, and supervised agricultural experience. FFA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Agricultural Mechanics II-Small Engines
Course Number: 6833
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 20
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-180
Course blueprint: Summer 2003 (pdf, 234kb)
Prerequisite: Agricultural Mechanics I
Description:
This course provides hands-on instruction and emphasizes small engine systems including the compression, fuel, electrical, cooling and lubrication systems. Troubleshooting methods are emphasized. Students learn how to select engines for specific applications. Materials are covered to prepare students for the Master Service Technician Exam. Safety skills are emphasized. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course are apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, job shadowing, and supervised agricultural experience. FFA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Agricultural Production I
Course Number: 6811
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 20
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-180
Course blueprint: Summer 2006 (pdf, 89kb)
Prerequisite: None
Description:
This course focuses on the basic scientific principles and processes related to the production of plants and animals for the food and fiber systems. Topics of instruction include basic understanding of the livestock/poultry industry and its various components, career opportunities, soil science, crop science/agronomy, weed science, basic agricultural machinery and related industry careers, environmental stewardship, and leadership/personal development. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course are apprenticeship, cooperative education, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, job shadowing, and supervised agricultural experience. FFA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Agricultural Production II
Course Number: 6811
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 20
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-180
Course blueprint: Summer 2006 (pdf, 70kb)
Prerequisite: Agricultural Production I
Description:
This course provides scientific knowledge and technical skills with heavy emphasis on topics including pesticide use and safety, herbicide use and safety, wildlife habitat concerns, irrigation, agricultural equipment technology and safety, global industry issues, career planning, and human resource development. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course are apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, job shadowing, and supervised agricultural experience. FFA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Agriscience Applications
Course Number: 6810
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 25
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-180
Course blueprint: Summer 2004 (pdf, 642kb)
Prerequisite: None
Description:
This course focuses on integrating biological/physical sciences with technology as related to the environment, natural resources, food production, science, and agribusiness. Topics of instruction include agricultural awareness and literacy, employability skills and introduction to all aspects of the total agricultural industry. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course are apprenticeship, cooperative education, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, job shadowing, and supervised agricultural experience. FFA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Animal Science I
Course Number: 6821
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 25
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-180
Course blueprint: Summer 2003 Revised (pdf, 566kb)
Prerequisite: None
Description:
This course focuses on the basic scientific principles and processes that are involved in animal physiology, breeding, nutrition, and care in preparation for an animal science career major. Topics include animal diseases, introduction to animal science, animal nutrition, animal science issues, career opportunities, and animal evaluation. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course are apprenticeship, cooperative education, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, job shadowing, and supervised agricultural experience. FFA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Animal Science II
Course Number: 6822
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 25
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-180
Course blueprint: Summer 2003 Revised (pdf, 630kb)
Prerequisite: Animal Science I
Description:
This course includes more advanced scientific principles and communication skills and includes animal waste management, animal science economics, decision making, global concerns in the industry, genetics, and breeding. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced in this class. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course are apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, job shadowing, and supervised agricultural experience. FFA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Animal Science II-Small Animal
Course Number: 6823
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 25
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-180
Course blueprint: Summer 2012 (pdf, 117kb)
Prerequisite: Animal Science I
Description:
This course provides instruction on animal science topics related to small animals that are served by a veterinarian. Content related to the breeding, grooming, care and marketing of animals that fit into this category are taught in this course. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced in this class. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course are apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, job shadowing, and supervised agricultural experience. FFA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Biotechnology and Agriscience Research I
Course Number: 6871
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 25
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-180
Course blueprint: Summer 2005 - Revised (pdf, 175kb)
Prerequisite: None
Description:
This course provides instruction in the technologically advanced world of agriculture and life sciences. Students are exposed to the latest techniques and advances in plant and animal biotechnology with a strong emphasis on hands-on activities. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course are apprenticeship, cooperative education, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, job shadowing, and supervised agricultural experience. FFA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. Agriscience Applications is recommended as preparation for this course.


Biotechnology and Agriscience Research II
Course Number: 6872
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 25
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-180
Course blueprint: Summer 2005 - Revised (pdf, 188kb)
Prerequisite: Biotechnology and Agriscience Research I
Description:
This course provides instruction in laboratory and safety skills needed by agricultural research scientists. Current applications of biotechnology in animal science, environmental science, food science and plant science are emphasized. Basic concepts of genetics and microbiology are applied to the agriculture industry and its success in providing food and fiber for the world. Opportunities exist for students to conduct individual or team research experiments. Hands-on laboratories and current topic discussions provide students an understanding of careers in agriscience research. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course are apprenticeship, cooperative education, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, job shadowing, and supervised agricultural experience. FFA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


CTE Advanced Studies
Course Number: 8595
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 25
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Prerequisite: Two technical credits in one Career Cluster
Description:
This culminating course is for juniors and seniors who have earned two technical credits, one of which is a completer course, in one Career Cluster. The Advanced Studies course must augment the content of the completer course and prepare students for success in transitioning to postsecondary education and future careers. Students work under the guidance of a teacher with expertise in the content of the completer course in collaboration with community members, business representatives, and other school-based personnel. The four parts of the course include writing a research paper, producing a product, developing a portfolio, and delivering a presentation. Students demonstrate their abilities to use 21st century skills. DECA (an association for Marketing Education students), Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), FFA, Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA), Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA), SkillsUSA, and Technology Student Association (TSA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


CTE Apprenticeship
Course Number: 8596
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: NA
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Prerequisite: Two technical credits in one Career Cluster
Description:
Students who participate in apprenticeships or pre-apprenticeships through the North Carolina Department of Labor, Apprenticeship and Training Bureau can also earn CTE credit while they earn hours and experience toward an adult apprenticeship leading to a completed journeyman certificate. This course is appropriate for occupations that do not require a college degree but require a high level of skill and knowledge.


CTE Career and College Promise I
Course Number: 8598
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: NA
Recommended Hours of Instruction: NA
Prerequisite: None
Description:
Career and College Promise provides a way for any North Carolina high school student in good academic standing who meets eligibility requirements to take community college courses while still in high school. Students can combine high school and postsecondary courses to earn a credential, certificate, or diploma in a technical field and meet requirements for CTE concentration. Credit may be transferrable to another North Carolina community college, to UNC System institutions, and to many of the stateÕs independent colleges and universities. Students should work with their school counselor to determine what CTE pathways are available at their local community college or in what other ways they can access this program.


CTE Career and College Promise II
Course Number: 8599
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: NA
Recommended Hours of Instruction: NA
Prerequisite: None
Description:
Career and College Promise provides a way for any North Carolina high school student in good academic standing who meets eligibility requirements to take community college courses while still in high school. Students can combine high school and postsecondary courses to earn a credential, certificate, or diploma in a technical field and meet requirements for CTE concentration. Credit may be transferrable to another North Carolina community college, to UNC System institutions, and to many of the stateÕs independent colleges and universities. Students should work with their school counselor to determine what CTE pathways are available at their local community college or in what other ways they can access this program.


CTE Internship
Course Number: 8597
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: NA
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Prerequisite: None
Description:
A CTE Internship allows for additional development of career and technical competencies within a general career field. Internships allow students to observe and participate in daily operations, develop direct contact with job personnel, ask questions about particular careers, and perform certain job tasks. This activity is exploratory and allows the student to get hands-on experience in a number of related activities. The teacher, student, and the business community jointly plan the organization, implementation, and evaluation of an internship, regardless of whether it is an unpaid or paid internship.


Environmental and Natural Resources I
Course Number: 6851
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 25
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-180
Course blueprint: Winter 2004 (pdf, 644kb)
Prerequisite: None
Description:
This course provides an introduction to environmental studies, which includes topics of instruction in renewable and non-renewable natural resources, history of the environment, personal development, water and air quality, waste management, land use regulations, soils, meteorology, fisheries, forestry, and wildlife habitat. Skills in biology and algebra are reinforced in this class. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course are agriscience projects, field trips, shadowing, and supervised agricultural experience. Supervised agricultural experience programs and FFA leadership activities are integral components of the course and provide many opportunities for practical application of instructional competencies.


Environmental and Natural Resources II
Course Number: 6852
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 25
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-180
Course blueprint: Summer 2005 (pdf, 140kb)
Prerequisite: Environmental and Natural Resources I
Description:
This course covers instruction in best management practices in methods of environmental monitoring and conservation, air and water regulations, sampling methodologies, prescribing conservation techniques, and wildlife and forestry management. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course are apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, job shadowing, and supervised agricultural experience. FFA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Equine Science I
Course Number: 6825
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 25
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-180
Course blueprint: Summer 2003 (pdf, 165kb)
Prerequisite: None
Description:
This course focuses on the basic scientific principles and processes related to equine physiology, breeding, nutrition, and care in preparation for a career in the equine industry. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course are apprenticeship, cooperative education, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, job shadowing, and supervised agricultural experience. FFA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Equine Science II
Course Number: 6826
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 25
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-180
Course blueprint: Winter 2004 (pdf, 541kb)
Prerequisite: Equine Science I
Description:
The course focuses on more advanced applications of feeding, breeding, and management practices involved in the horse industry. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course are apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, job shadowing, and supervised agricultural experience. FFA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Exploring Agricultural Science
Course Number: 6829
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 25
Recommended Hours of Instruction: Local Decision
Course blueprint: Summer 2011 (pdf, 2.8mb)
Prerequisite: None
Description:
This middle school course introduces students to the industry of agriculture. Topics of instruction include animal science, agricultural science and technology, plant science, agricultural issues, natural resources, food science, stewardship, consumer agriculture, and careers in agricultural science. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course are mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, job shadowing, and supervised agricultural experience. FFA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Exploring Biotechnology in Agriculture
Course Number: 6828
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 30
Recommended Hours of Instruction: Local Decision
Course blueprint: Summer 2004 (pdf, 374kb)
Prerequisite: None
Description:
This middle school course focuses on the agricultural and medical industry with emphasis on the relationship of science and technology that affects agriculture, medicine, and health care. Topics include career concepts in the agriculture and medical fields. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. This course contributes to the development of a career development plan. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course are mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, job shadowing, and supervised agricultural experience. FFA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Horticulture I
Course Number: 6841
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 25
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Summer 2012 (pdf, 51kb)
Prerequisite: None
Description:
This course provides instruction on the broad field of horticulture with emphasis on the scientific and technical knowledge for a career in horticulture. Topics in this course include plant growth and development, plant nutrition, media selection, basic plant identification, pest management, chemical disposal, customer relations, and career opportunities. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course are apprenticeship, cooperative education, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, job shadowing, and supervised agricultural experience. FFA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Horticulture II
Course Number: 6842
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 25
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Summer 2003 (pdf, 771kb)
Prerequisite: Horticulture I
Description:
This course covers instruction that expands scientific knowledge and skills to include more advanced scientific computations and communication skills needed in the horticulture industry. Topics include greenhouse plant production and management, bedding plant production, watering systems, light effects, basic landscape design, installation and maintenance, lawn and turfgrass management, and personal development. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course are apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, job shadowing, and supervised agricultural experience. FFA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Horticulture II - Landscaping
Course Number: 6882
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 25
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Summer 2009 Version 2 (pdf, 37kb)
Prerequisite: Horticulture I
Description:
This course provides hands-on instruction and emphasizes safety skills needed by landscape technicians in the field. This course is based on the North Carolina Landscape Contractor's Association skill standards for a Certified Landscape Technician. Students are instructed in interpreting landscape designs, identifying landscape plants, and planting/maintaining trees, shrubs and turf. Landscape construction is emphasized in the areas of grading and drainage, irrigation, paver installation and the use/ maintenance of landscape equipment. Current topic discussions provide students an understanding of careers and the employability skills needed to enter the landscape industry. Opportunities exist for students to conduct internships or apprenticeships as landscape technicians.


Horticulture II - Turf Grass Management
Course Number: 6843
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 25
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Summer 2003 (pdf, 662kb)
Prerequisite: Horticulture I
Description:
This course provides hands-on instruction and emphasizes eight units of instruction including fundamentals of soils and pests, environmental issues related to turf management, landscape basics, lawn care and turf production, golf course management, sports turf and turf irrigation, turf equipment and maintenance, and human resources and financial management. Safety skills will be emphasized. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course are apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, job shadowing, and supervised agricultural experience. FFA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Project Management I
Course Number: 8510
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 30
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Summer 2012 (pdf, 166kb)
Prerequisite: None
Description:
This course will introduce students to the principles, concepts, and software applications used in the management of projects. Through project-based learning, students will understand how to use the framework of initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, and closing a project in authentic situations. Art, English language arts, and mathematics are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. DECA (an association for Marketing Education students), Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), FFA, Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA), SkillsUSA, and Technology Student Association (TSA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Project Management II -- Global
Course Number: 8511
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 30
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Under development
Prerequisite: Project Management I
Description:
This project-based course focuses on the impact of cultural differences and exchange rate fluctuations on business practices and the marketing mix in global markets. Students will understand factors that affect manufacturing and research location selection, the impact of local government policies and procedures on market decision making, and the use of strategic alliances to acquire additional necessary experience. Finally, students will learn to identify and manage risk in global market development. Art, English language arts, and mathematics are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. DECA (an association for Marketing Education students), Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), FFA, Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA), SkillsUSA, and Technology Student Association (TSA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Project Management II -- Technology
Course Number: 8512
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 30
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Under development
Prerequisite: Project Management I
Description:
This project-based course focuses on the use of information technology to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of project management and integrated enterprise. Students will learn operational strategies for managing advanced technology and innovation as well as how to map the high technology operations environment to business settings. Art, English language arts, and mathematics are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. DECA (an association for Marketing Education students), Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), FFA, Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA), SkillsUSA, and Technology Student Association (TSA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Project Management III
Course Number: 8513
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 30
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 125-150
Course blueprint: Under development
Prerequisite:
Project Management II -- Global OR Project Management II -- Technology
Description:
This project-based, culminating course covers the management of a complete project in an authentic environment. Students will be responsible for planning, monitoring, controlling, and completing a series of smaller projects as well as a capstone project. Art, English language arts, and mathematics are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. DECA (an association for Marketing Education students), Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), FFA, Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA), SkillsUSA, and Technology Student Association (TSA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

Local Course Options

Schools may offer one or more specialized courses not included in the Standard Course of Study. These courses should meet a local economic need. Options may include:

  • Aquaculture
  • Floriculture

Refer to Part I, Local Course Options, and Appendix B for instructions on how to offer these courses.

Notes:

A:Adopted from another source, contact program area for more information on ordering
R:Reformatted but not otherwise revised
P:Pilot
D:Draft
L:Leadership objectives revised
OL:Outline

1:Curriculum guide not available in electronic format.
2:Alternative forms of curriculum products will be distributed
3:A complete package is available commercially
4:Draft or pilot blueprint are provided for review purposes only.
 Contact program area for piloting opportunities.
5:Use objectives from other T&I Education courses (See Standard Course of Study)
6:Bank not yet validated; released in pilot form.
7:Students enrolled in course should be tested with performance assessments
 and industry certification exams.

 
 
Status of Curriculum Materials
Programs of Study
FFA
Classroom Resources
Status of Curriculum Materials
Programs of Study
FBLA: Business, Finance and Information Technology
Classroom Resources
Status of Curriculum Materials
Programs of Study
Classroom Resources
Status of Curriculum Materials
Programs of Study
FCCLA: Family Consumer Sciences
Classroom Resources
Status of Curriculum Materials
Programs of Study
HOSA: Health Science
Classroom Resources
Status of Curriculum Materials
Programs of Study
DECA: Marketing and Entrepreneurship
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TSA: Technology Engineering and Design
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Status of Curriculum Materials
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Skills USA: Trade and Industrial
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