To access Quick Links, visit our text-only version.

. Public Schools of North Carolina . . State Board of Education . . Department Of Public Instruction .

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES
PROGRAMS OF STUDY

NOTE :: Various file formats are used on this page that may require download. If larger than 1mb, it will take longer to download. For instructions or more information, please visit our download page.


Apparel I
Course Number: 7035
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 20 (or 2 per sewing machine)
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Winter 2004 (pdf, 226kb)
Prerequisite: None
Description:
In this course students are introduced to clothing production in the areas of preparation for clothing construction, basic clothing construction techniques, consumer decisions, textiles, historical perspectives and design, and career opportunities. Emphasis is placed on students applying these construction and design skills to apparel and home fashion. Art, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include service learning and job shadowing. Apprenticeship and Cooperative education are not available for this course. Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Apparel II - Enterprise
Course Number: 7036
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 20 (or 2 per sewing machine)
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Winter 2004 (pdf, 135kb)
Prerequisite: Apparel I
Description:
In this course students are introduced to advanced clothing and housing apparel development skills. The use of fibers and fabrics is combined with design and construction techniques to develop and produce clothing or housing apparel products. A real or simulated apparel business enterprise and FCCLA activities allow students to apply instructional strategies and workplace readiness skills to an authentic experience and to develop a portfolio. Mathematics and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


CTE Advanced Studies
Course Number: 8595
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 25
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Prerequisite: Two technical credits in one Career Cluster
Description:
This culminating course is for juniors and seniors who have earned two technical credits, one of which is a completer course, in one Career Cluster. The Advanced Studies course must augment the content of the completer course and prepare students for success in transitioning to postsecondary education and future careers. Students work under the guidance of a teacher with expertise in the content of the completer course in collaboration with community members, business representatives, and other school-based personnel. The four parts of the course include writing a research paper, producing a product, developing a portfolio, and delivering a presentation. Students demonstrate their abilities to use 21st century skills. DECA (an association for Marketing Education students), Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), FFA, Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA), Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA), SkillsUSA, and Technology Student Association (TSA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


CTE Apprenticeship
Course Number: 8596
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: NA
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Prerequisite: Two technical credits in one Career Cluster
Description:
Students who participate in apprenticeships or pre-apprenticeships through the North Carolina Department of Labor, Apprenticeship and Training Bureau can also earn CTE credit while they earn hours and experience toward an adult apprenticeship leading to a completed journeyman certificate. This course is appropriate for occupations that do not require a college degree but require a high level of skill and knowledge.


CTE Career and College Promise I
Course Number: 8598
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: NA
Recommended Hours of Instruction: NA
Prerequisite: None
Description:
Career and College Promise provides a way for any North Carolina high school student in good academic standing who meets eligibility requirements to take community college courses while still in high school. Students can combine high school and postsecondary courses to earn a credential, certificate, or diploma in a technical field and meet requirements for CTE concentration. Credit may be transferrable to another North Carolina community college, to UNC System institutions, and to many of the stateÕs independent colleges and universities. Students should work with their school counselor to determine what CTE pathways are available at their local community college or in what other ways they can access this program.


CTE Career and College Promise II
Course Number: 8599
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: NA
Recommended Hours of Instruction: NA
Prerequisite: None
Description:
Career and College Promise provides a way for any North Carolina high school student in good academic standing who meets eligibility requirements to take community college courses while still in high school. Students can combine high school and postsecondary courses to earn a credential, certificate, or diploma in a technical field and meet requirements for CTE concentration. Credit may be transferrable to another North Carolina community college, to UNC System institutions, and to many of the stateÕs independent colleges and universities. Students should work with their school counselor to determine what CTE pathways are available at their local community college or in what other ways they can access this program.


CTE Internship
Course Number: 8597
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: NA
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Prerequisite: None
Description:
A CTE Internship allows for additional development of career and technical competencies within a general career field. Internships allow students to observe and participate in daily operations, develop direct contact with job personnel, ask questions about particular careers, and perform certain job tasks. This activity is exploratory and allows the student to get hands-on experience in a number of related activities. The teacher, student, and the business community jointly plan the organization, implementation, and evaluation of an internship, regardless of whether it is an unpaid or paid internship.


Culinary Arts and Hospitality I
Course Number: 7121
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 20
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Summer 2005 (pdf, 119kb)
Prerequisite: Induction to Culinary Arts and Hospitality
Description:
This course focuses on basic skills in cold and hot food production, baking and pastry, and service skills. Art, English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include service learning and job shadowing. Apprenticeship and cooperative education are not available for this course. Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply instructional competencies and workplace readiness skills to authentic experiences.


Culinary Arts and Hospitality II
Course Number: 7122
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 20
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 270-300
Course blueprint: Summer 2005 version 2 (pdf, 107kb)
Prerequisite: Culinary Arts and Hospitality I
Description:
This course provides advanced experiences in cold and hot and food production, management (front and back of the house), and service skills. Topics include menu planning, business management, and guest relations. Art, English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning and job shadowing. Family, Career and Community leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Early Childhood Education I
Course Number: 7111
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 20
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 270-300
Course blueprint: Summer 2008 Version 2 (pdf, 51kb)
Prerequisite: Students must be 16 by October 1
Description:
This two-credit course prepares students to work with children in early education and child care settings. Areas of study include personal and professional preparation, child development from birth to age 12, techniques and procedures for working with young children, and history, trends and opportunities in this field. An internship makes up 50 percent of instructional time. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include internship, mentorship, service learning, and job shadowing. Cooperative education and apprenticeship are not available for this course. Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. Parenting and Child Development is recommended as preparation for this course.


Early Childhood Education II
Course Number: 7112
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 20
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 270-300
Course blueprint: Summer 2009 Version 2 (pdf, 32kb)
Prerequisite: Early Childhood Education I
Description:
This two-credit course provides advanced experiences in working with children from infancy to age 12 in early education and child care settings. Areas of study include program planning and management, developmentally appropriate practice, procedures and strategies for working with special groups of children, and career development and professionalism. An internship makes up 50 percent of instructional time. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include internship, mentorship, service learning, and job shadowing. Cooperative education and apprenticeship are not available for this course. Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Exploring Life Skills
Course Number: 7018
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 25
Recommended Hours of Instruction: Local decision
Course blueprint: Summer 2001 (pdf, 320kb)
Prerequisite: None
Description:
This middle school course allows students to explore life skills essential for their roles as managers, consumers, workers, and family members both now and in the future. Areas of study include managing resources, relating with others, making healthy food choices, learning about children, and preparing for careers. Art, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include service learning and job shadowing. Apprenticeship and cooperative education are not available for this course. Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Fashion Merchandising
Course Number: 6631
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 30
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Summer 2005 (pdf, 96kb)
Prerequisite: None
Description:
In this course students are introduced to the fashion and merchandising industries. Students acquire transferable knowledge and skills among the concepts of the business of fashion, fashion promotion events, the evolution and movement of fashion, the fashion industry, career development, merchandising of fashion, and the selling of fashion. Mathematics and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. DECA (an association for Marketing Education students) and Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Foods I
Course Number: 7045
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 20 (or 4-5 per laboratory kitchen)
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Summer 2010 Version 2 (pdf, 26kb)
Prerequisite: None
Description:
This course examines the nutritional needs of the individual. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of diet to health, kitchen and meal management, food preparation and sustainability for a global society, and time and resource management. English language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include service learning and job shadowing. Apprenticeship and cooperative education are not available for this course. Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Foods II-Enterprise
Course Number: 7046
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 20 (or 4-5 per laboratory kitchen)
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Summer 2004 (pdf, 172kb)
Prerequisite: Foods I OR Culinary Arts and Hospitality I
Description:
This course focuses on advanced food preparation techniques while applying nutrition, food science, and test kitchen concepts using new technology. Food safety and sanitation receive special emphasis, with students taking the exam for a nationally recognized food safety credential. Students develop skills in preparing foods such as beverages, salads and dressing, yeast breads, and cake fillings and frostings. A real or simulated in-school food business component allows students to apply instructional strategies. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning and job shadowing. Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Foods II-Technology
Course Number: 7075
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 20 (or 4-5 per laboratory kitchen)
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Summer 2009 (pdf, 46kb)
Prerequisite:
Foods I or Culinary Arts and Hospitality I or Environmental Science or Physical Science or Biology or Chemistry
Description:
This course explores the food industry from the farm to the table using skills in food science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Government regulations, emerging trends, biotechnology, and technological career opportunities from scientists to technicians will be presented. The student examines production, processing, preparation, preservation, and packaging principles along the farm to table continuum. The student begins to understand how food technology affects the food that he/she eats. English language arts are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Interior Applications
Course Number: 7153
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 25
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Summer 2005 (pdf, 121kb)
Prerequisite: Interior Design II
Description:
This course prepares students for entry-level and technical work opportunities in interior design. Students develop interior applications to meet clientsÕ needs using components found in residential and non-residential settings. Students apply design, selection, production, and renovation skills to wall and floor coverings, lighting, windows, case goods, and upholstered furniture. Art and mathematics are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. Family Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Interior Design I
Course Number: 7151
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 25
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Summer 2006 (pdf, 269kb)
Prerequisite: None
Description:
This course focuses on housing needs and options of individuals and families at various stages of the life cycle. Emphasis is placed on selecting goods and services and creating functional, pleasing living environments using sound financial decisions and principles of design. Topics of study include elements and principles of design, backgrounds and furnishings, architectural styles and features, and functional room design. Art and mathematics are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. Family, Career Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Interior Design II
Course Number: 7152
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 25
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Summer 2005 (pdf, 125kb)
Prerequisite: Interior Design I
Description:
This course prepares students for entry-level and technical work opportunities in the residential and non-residential interior design fields. Students deepen their understanding of design fundamentals and theory by designing interior plans to meet living space needs of specific individuals or families. Topics include application of design theory to interior plans and production, selection of materials, and examination of business procedures. Art and mathematics are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Introduction to Culinary Arts and Hospitality
Course Number: 7120
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 20
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Summer 2005 Version 2 (pdf, 164kb)
Prerequisite: None
Description:
In this course, basic safety and sanitation practices leading to a national industry-recognized food safety credential are introduced. Commercial equipment, smallwares, culinary math, and basic knife skills in a commercial foodservice facility are taught. Art, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include service learning and job shadowing. Apprenticeship and cooperative education are not available for this course. Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. Foods I is recommended as preparation for this course.


Parenting and Child Development
Course Number: 7065
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 25
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Summer 2009 Version 2 (pdf, 29kb)
Prerequisite: None
Description:
This course introduces students to responsible nurturing and basic applications of child development theory with children from infancy through age six. Areas of study include parenthood decisions, child care issues, prenatal development and care, and development and care of infants, toddlers, and children three through six. Emphasis is on responsibilities of parents, readiness for parenting, and the influence parents have on children while providing care and guidance. Art, English language arts, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include service learning and job shadowing. Apprenticeship and cooperative education are not available for this course. Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Personal Finance
Course Number: 8726
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 25
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Summer 2010 Version 2 (pdf, 32kb)
Prerequisite: None
Description:
This course prepares students to understand economic activities and challenges of individuals and families, the role of lifestyle goals in education and career choices, procedures in a successful job search, financial forms used in independent living, and shopping options and practices for meeting consumer needs. The course also prepares students to understand consumer rights, responsibilities and information, protect personal and family resources, and apply procedures for managing personal finances. English language arts and mathematics are reinforced in this course. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship and cooperative education are not available for this course. DECA (an association for Marketing Education students), Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) and Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Project Management I
Course Number: 8510
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 30
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Summer 2012 (pdf, 167kb)
Prerequisite: None
Description:
This course will introduce students to the principles, concepts, and software applications used in the management of projects. Through project-based learning, students will understand how to use the framework of initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, and closing a project in authentic situations. Art, English language arts, and mathematics are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. DECA (an association for Marketing Education students), Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), FFA, Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA), SkillsUSA, and Technology Student Association (TSA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Project Management II -- Global
Course Number: 8511
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 30
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Under development
Prerequisite: Project Management I
Description:
This project-based course focuses on the impact of cultural differences and exchange rate fluctuations on business practices and the marketing mix in global markets. Students will understand factors that affect manufacturing and research location selection, the impact of local government policies and procedures on market decision making, and the use of strategic alliances to acquire additional necessary experience. Finally, students will learn to identify and manage risk in global market development. Art, English language arts, and mathematics are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. DECA (an association for Marketing Education students), Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), FFA, Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA), SkillsUSA, and Technology Student Association (TSA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Project Management II -- Technology
Course Number: 8512
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 30
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Under development
Prerequisite: Project Management I
Description:
This project-based course focuses on the use of information technology to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of project management and integrated enterprise. Students will learn operational strategies for managing advanced technology and innovation as well as how to map the high technology operations environment to business settings. Art, English language arts, and mathematics are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. DECA (an association for Marketing Education students), Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), FFA, Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA), SkillsUSA, and Technology Student Association (TSA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Project Management III
Course Number: 8513
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 30
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 125-150
Course blueprint: Under development
Prerequisite:
Project Management II -- Global OR Project Management II -- Technology
Description:
This project-based, culminating course covers the management of a complete project in an authentic environment. Students will be responsible for planning, monitoring, controlling, and completing a series of smaller projects as well as a capstone project. Art, English language arts, and mathematics are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. DECA (an association for Marketing Education students), Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), FFA, Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA), SkillsUSA, and Technology Student Association (TSA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


ProStart I
Course Number: 7171
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 20 (or 4-5 per laboratory kitchen)
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Summer 2012 (pdf, 153kb)
Prerequisite: None
Description:
This national credentialing and fundamental food service course allows students to master kitchen basics, such as foodservice equipment, nutrition, breakfast foods, salads and garnishes, and fruits and vegetables. A heavy emphasis is placed on safety and sanitation, including preparing and serving safe food and preventing accidents and injuries. Students learn about successful customer relations and working with people, business math, and controlling foodservice cost. A required, one-credit paid or unpaid 200-hour internship will count toward the National ProStart ¨ Certificate of Achievement at the conclusion of ProStart¨ II. English language arts and mathematics are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. Students are eligible to compete at the state and national levels of Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) and/or ProStart¨ competitive events. Community service and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


ProStart II
Course Number: 7172
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 20 (or 4-5 per laboratory kitchen)
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Summer 2012 (pdf, 153kb)
Prerequisite: ProStart I
Description:
In this national credentialing, one credit, and second level fundamental food service course, students study advanced skills hospitality industry, including tourism and the retail industry, the history of foodservice, and the lodging industry. Advanced food service skills include potatoes and grains, meat, poultry, seafood, stocks, soups and sauces, desserts, and baked goods. Service skills are refined through the art of service and communicating with customers. Students learn purchasing and industry control, standard accounting practices and how to build restaurant sales through marketing and the menu. Students will complete the remainder of a required 400-hour paid or unpaid one-credit internship, which will count toward the National ProStart¨ Certificate of Achievement. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Students are encouraged to compete at the state and national levels of Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) and/or ProStart¨ competitive events. Community service and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.


Teen Living
Course Number: 7015
Recommended Maximum Enrollment: 20
Recommended Hours of Instruction: 135-150
Course blueprint: Summer 2004 (pdf, 425kb)
Prerequisite: None
Description:
This course examines life management skills in the areas of personal and family living, wellness, nutrition and foods, financial management, living environments, appropriate child development practices, fashion and clothing, and job readiness. Emphasis is placed on students applying these skills during their teen years. Through simulated experiences, they learn to fulfill their responsibilities associated with the work of the family and community. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include mentorship and service learning. Apprenticeship and cooperative education are not available for this course. Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

Local Course Options

Schools may offer one or more specialized courses not included in the Programs of Study. These courses should meet a local economic need. Options may include:

  • Family and Interpersonal Relationships
  • Consumer Education and Resource Management

Refer to Part I, Local Course Options, and Appendix B for instructions on how to offer these courses.

Notes:

A:Adopted from another source, contact program area for more information on ordering
R:Reformatted but not otherwise revised
P:Pilot
D:Draft
L:Leadership objectives revised
OL:Outline

1:Curriculum guide not available in electronic format.
2:Alternative forms of curriculum products will be distributed
3:A complete package is available commercially
4:Draft or pilot blueprint are provided for review purposes only.
 Contact program area for piloting opportunities.
5:Use objectives from other T&I Education courses (See Standard Course of Study)
6:Bank not yet validated; released in pilot form.
7:Students enrolled in course should be tested with performance assessments
 and industry certification exams.

 
 
Status of Curriculum Materials
Programs of Study
FFA: Agricultural Education
Classroom Resources
Status of Curriculum Materials
Programs of Study
FBLA: Business, Finance and Information Technology
Classroom Resources
Status of Curriculum Materials
Programs of Study
Classroom Resources
Status of Curriculum Materials
Programs of Study
FCCLA: Family Consumer Sciences
Classroom Resources
Status of Curriculum Materials
Programs of Study
HOSA: Health Science
Classroom Resources
Status of Curriculum Materials
Programs of Study
DECA: Marketing and Entrepreneurship
Classroom Resources
Status of Curriculum Materials
Programs of Study
TSA: Technology Engineering and Design
Classroom Resources
Status of Curriculum Materials
Programs of Study
Skills USA: Trade and Industrial
Classroom Resources