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ARTS EDUCATION TEACHER HANDBOOK

MUSIC :: HIGH SCHOOL LESSON PLAN

HIGH SCHOOL LESSON PLAN

 

Submitted by Ramona P. Jenner, Wake County Public Schools

Lesson Title:
Creating Sight-Singing Originals

Grade Level or Course:
Vocal Music I, 9-12 (can be used with 6th Grade Chorus)

Time Allotment:
3 Lessons: 1 (45 minute) lesson for the introduction of connecting rhythmic and melodic sight-singing examples to the choral selections, meters and note values being studied in class; 1 (45 minute) lesson for students to write their own sight-singing examples; 1 (45 minute lesson) for students to perform their sight-singing examples for the class.

Targeted Goals and Objectives from the 2000 North Carolina Arts Education Standard Course
of Study and Grade Level Competencies, K - 12:

6th Grade:

  • 4.04-Show respect for the composing and arranging efforts of others.
  • 5.01-Read whole, half, quarter, eighth, sixteenth, and dotted note and rest durations in 2/4, 3/4, 4/4, 6/8 and 2/2 meters.
  • 5.03-Sightread simple melodic notation in the treble clef.
  • 5.04 Identify standard notation symbols for pitch, rhythm, dynamics, tempo, articulation and expression.
  • 5.05-Show respect for the reading and notating efforts of others.
  • 6.05-Show respect while listening to and analyzing music.

Vocal Music I: (9-12)

  • 4.04-Show respect for the composing and arranging efforts of others.
  • 5.01-Read whole, half, quarter, eighth, sixteenth, and dotted note and rest durations in 2/4, 3/4, 4/4, 6/8, 3/8, 2/2 and mixed meters.
  • 5.02-Sightread melodies.
  • 5.04-Use standard notation symbols for pitch, rhythm, dynamics, tempo, articulation, and expression to record own musical ideas and musical ideas of others.
  • 5.05-Show respect for the reading and notating efforts of others.
  • 6.06-Show respect while listening to and analyzing music.

Targeted Goals and Objectives from the North Carolina Standard Course of Study and Grade
Level Competencies, K-12
for other content areas.

Mathematics ?Patterns, Groupings, Addition

 

Lesson Objective(s):

As part of their study of meters and note values in music, the students will create original sight-singing examples to be performed in class using specified guidelines. Students will use a rubric for self/group evaluation. A rubric for the sight-singing example will be utilized as well. Sight-singing examples will be notated using traditional methods. Each sight-singing example will be performed for the class and will then be combined to create a collection of sight-singing examples to be used in all chorus classes for sight-singing exercises.

Materials/Equipment Needed:

Examples of Choral music being rehearsed in class utilizing different meters and note values; Sight-singing examples provided by teacher; music manuscript paper; pencil; rubric for self/group evaluation (developed in class with teacher guidance), rubric to assess sight-singing example (teacher created). *See Assessment Item that aligns with this Lesson Plan for copies of the rubrics

 

Lesson Procedure:

Lesson 1 (45 minutes)

  1. Students are introduced to the idea that they will have the opportunity to create their own sight-singing examples to use in Chorus class. They will be incorporating concepts that they have learned in class on meter, note values, writing in treble clef, notating music, etc. to produce a short sight-singing example.
  2. A connection of rhythmic and melodic sight-singing examples to the Choral selections being rehearsed in class is introduced. The teacher first introduces a written example of a rhythmic exercise (simply written on the chalk board) that utilizes a tricky rhythm from one of the Choral selections being rehearsed in class. The students were asked to identify the meter and note values used in the example. Students first count the rhythm, note specific measures that may pose difficulty, and then clap the rhythm as a group. This may be done between 1 and 3 times, or until students successfully perform the rhythm. The students are next introduced to a melodic sight-singing example created by the teacher on staff paper. Again, they identify the meter and note values used, note specific measures that may pose difficulty, clap the example if needed, then attempt to sing the example when provided the starting pitch. Again, this example could use a small portion of a melodic idea from one of the pieces being rehearsed in class. The teacher should note how the sight-singing example is constructed and notated on music manuscript paper. At this point, a rubric that will be used as an assessment tool in evaluating sight-singing examples should be presented to the students and discussed.
  3. During the remainder of the lesson, students should note any specific measures that are tricky rhythmically or melodically while they rehearse their Choral pieces. These may or may not serve as a basis or idea in creating a sight-singing example in class.
  4. Inform students that when they return to class the next day, they will be working in groups of 3 to 4 create their own sight-singing examples.

Lesson 2 (45 minutes)

  1. Students are divided into groups of 2 or 3, depending on class size. (Students with more advanced musical backgrounds may be allowed to work individually.) Review the sight-singing example introduced in the previous class as a guide for the students and remind them to utilized meters and note values studied in class and in their Choral selections.
  2. Students are provided the remainder of class time to brainstorm, discuss, and record their sight-singing example on music manuscript paper.
  3. At the end of class, groups will complete the group evaluation rubric.

Lesson 3 (45 minutes)

  1. Each group or individual performs their sight-singing example for the class.
  2. Use criteria from the rubric for discussion about the sight-singing examples. Class members may give positive comments about the examples with the teacher making any kind of suggestions for improvements, if needed.
  3. Have students discuss what they have learned from the process. Sight-singing examples can be grouped by the teacher into a collection for Chorus classes to use during rehearsals. These can also be distributed to students.

Assessment: (see Assessment Item that aligns with this Lesson Plan)

Assessments of group or individual work: Students will self/group assess using a rubric designed by the students and teacher. The rubric should incorporate students? ability to evaluate group work.
Assessment of individuals: The teacher will assess each student using a rubric that students are familiar with, that incorporates the guidelines for their sight-singing examples.

Special Considerations:

This lesson should be completed after students have had experience reading and writing musical notation in treble clef. Individuals with extensive music reading skills should be allowed to work on their own individual example. Students who move quickly with creating their own sight singing examples my wish to add lyrics to be sung in place of numbers, syllables, etc. This lesson may take more than the allotted class times, depending on the abilities of students, and the size of the class.

 

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