ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS FAQ

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS :: FAQ

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GENERAL ELA (K-12)


ELEMENTARY LANGUAGE ARTS


SECONDARY ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS


GENERAL ELA (K-12)

Join the ELA list serve(s) for the grade(s) you teach:
https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/NCSBE/subscriber/new

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Here are web addresses of some of the most prominent professional organizations for our field:

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Live Binder Resources

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NCDPI does not be provide pacing guides for ELA. Districts may choose to develop and use pacing guides for ELA. Text selection and curriculum development is a district-level decision. NCDPI provides resources and tools for districts choosing to do so.

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CCSSO Navigating Text Complexity  

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NCDPI does not require or recommend any particular texts for students to read at any level. The selection of materials is a local, school, and individual teacher responsibility. Teachers should select texts based upon formative assessment measures, grade-level standards, and the complexity of the text.

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These decisions are made at the local system or school level. NCDPI does not endorse particular programs or publishers. The NCSCoS for ELA provides what students should know and be able to do at each grade level but decisions about materials are made at the system, school, and classroom levels.

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State law 115C-98 (b) requires all school systems have a board adopted selection policy that includes a process for reconsideration of instructional resources and challenges.

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NCDPI Accountability Services Division

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You can find more information about licensure on the NCDPI Licensure website

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ELEMENTARY LANGUAGE ARTS


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The K-2 ELA Assessment is available under Elementary Resources {TOP}

 

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SECONDARY ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS


High School Sequencing for English/Language Arts
To become college and career ready, students must grapple with works of exceptional craft and thought whose range extends across genres, cultures, and centuries. Such works offer profound insights into the human condition and serve as models for students’ own thinking and writing. Along with high-quality contemporary works, these texts should be chosen from among seminal U.S. documents, the classics of American literature, and the timeless dramas of Shakespeare. Through wide and deep reading of literature and literary nonfiction of steadily increasing sophistication, students gain a reservoir of literary and cultural knowledge, references, and images; the ability to evaluate intricate arguments; and the capacity to surmount the challenges posed by complex texts. (CCSS).

The literary and informational texts a teacher uses in a classroom provide a vehicle by which to teach the standards. Careful selection should ensure students will have a rich and diverse understanding of a variety of texts by the end of their senior year. Most importantly, all students should have opportunities to access complex text within their grade band. Curriculum choices such as designating certain years for a specific genre or country study (British Literature, American Literature, World Literature) are up to LEAs to decide.

Please contact Julie Joslin at Julie.joslin@dpi.nc.gov for more information.

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English I, II, III, and IV are the four high school courses required for graduation.

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