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NEWS RELEASES 2000-01

NEWS RELEASES 2000-01 :: MARCH 1, 2001

CHARTER SCHOOL CAP MET WITH RECENT APPROVAL OF SIX NEW SCHOOLS

The State Board of Education today approved six new charter schools, bringing the total number of charter schools operating in the state to 100 - the program's cap.

The six new charter schools approved by the Board to begin operation in 2001-02 are:

  • Crossroads Charter High School (Mecklenburg County). The educational focus will target high-risk students (this includes academically gifted students) through individualized education plans for students in grades 9-12.
  • Queen's Grant Community School (Mecklenburg County). The educational focus will be on Core Knowledge and Character Development for grades K-5 initially and expand through grade 8.
  • Hope Elementary School (Wake County). The educational focus will target at-risk children in grades K-4 initially and expand to grade 5.
  • Ann Atwater Community School (Durham County). The educational focus will target at-risk children and use the Coalition of Essential Schools Reform Model for grades 4-9 initially and expand through grade 12.
  • Oak Ridge Charter School (Guilford County). The educational focus will be on Core Knowledge and Character Development for grades K-5 initially and expand through grade 8.
  • Clover Garden School (Alamance County). The educational focus will be on Core Knowledge for grades K-8 and expand through grade 12.

The charter school law, enacted in 1996, is intended to foster creative approaches to education by relieving these schools from many state regulations and requirements. Charter schools are public schools, offered to parents as one choice for their children's education. Statewide, charter schools serve many student populations and focus on a variety of approaches to education.

Charters are granted by the State Board of Education and are in effect for five years. Since 1997, 116 charters have received approval. Twenty-two schools are no longer operating either because they did not accept the charter (2), they voluntarily relinquished their charter (13), or they had their charter revoked (7).

For more information, contact Grova Bridges, Office of Charter Schools, 919.807.3302.

About the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction:
The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction provides leadership to 115 local public school districts and 107 charter schools serving over 1.5 million students in kindergarten through high school graduation. The agency is responsible for all aspects of the state's public school system and works under the direction of the North Carolina State Board of Education.


For more information:
NCDPI Communications and Information, 919.807.3450.