SCHOOL PERFORMANCE

End-of-Grade and End-of-Course Tests

All data reported in this section are based on student performance on the North Carolina End-of-Grade (EOG) and End-of-Course (EOC) assessments. Students in grades 3-8 must take annual EOGs in English language arts/reading, mathematics and science (grades 5 and 8). Students enrolled in any of the following courses must take EOCs: English II, Math I, and Biology.

There are five levels of performance on the state's EOG and EOC assessments ranging from Levels 1-5. Detailed definitions may be found on the NC Department of Public Instruction's Accountability Services website.

EOG percentages are based on the number of a school's reading, mathematics and science tests scored at Level 3 or above (grade level proficiency) and Level 4 and above (college- and-career ready proficiency) in the 2014-15 school year. EOC percentages are based on the number of a school's EOC assessments scored at Level 3 or above (grade level proficiency) and Level 4 and above (college- and career-ready proficiency) in the 2014-15 school year. Scores for non-high school students enrolled in courses subject to testing requirements are also reported. For schools beginning with 9th grade, EOC percentages include assessments administered to students prior to their 9th grade year, the year the student is designated a 9th grader. These are called banked scores.

EOG and EOC results may include scores from a summer administration of the EOG or EOC completed prior to June 30th, where the students received a higher score than on a previous attempt. These administrations were completed during a summer program provided by the school or district.

Results for students with disabilities taking the alternate assessment (NCEXTEND1) are included in the reported percentages. Additional information is provided on the web-based version of the NC School Report Cards. For example, tables display the number and percentage of students at each of the five achievement levels on the EOG English language arts/reading test. This information also is displayed for students of each racial/ethnic category, gender, economic status, disability status, migrant status, English language learners, and academically/intellectually gifted. Detailed achievement level results for each grade level and course tested are also available. Data on the number of students taking the North Carolina EOG tests also are provided on the web-based Report Card.

The READY Accountability Model and federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) require schools to test at least 95 percent of their students. Students with disabilities taking the alternate assessment are credited as having been tested. Where no scores are reported or the number of students is too small (less than ten) to ensure that student test results aren't personally identifiable, a N/A (not available) will appear. In any group where the percentage of students at a grade level is greater than 95% or less than 5%, the actual values may not be displayed because of federal privacy regulations. In these cases, the results will be shown as 95% or 5% or “.” for the group.

Student performance on the North Carolina End-of-Grade and End-of-Course tests is disaggregated by student group. For each student group, the percentage of scores at Level 3 or above and at Level 4 and above is reported. Data are reported for the following seven student groups:

  • Gender: Male and Female
  • Racial/Ethnic: American Indian, Asian, Black, Hispanic, Pacific Islander, Two or More Races, and White. The one exception to Two or More Races is the combination of Hispanic with any other race/ethnicity: Hispanic overrides the other race/ethnicity and the student is identified as Hispanic.
  • Economically disadvantaged students were identified for 2014-15 analysis in accordance with a Memorandum of Agreement between the School Nutrition Services Section and the Division of Accountability Services.
  • Limited English Proficient (L.E.P.): LEP students are students whose first language is not English and who need language assistance to participate fully in the regular curriculum.
  • Migrant Students: To be considered a "Migrant Student," a child must engage in or have parents or guardians who engage in migrant agricultural work. The child also must have moved within the preceding 36 months to accommodate temporary or seasonal agricultural work. There is a formal certification process to identify migrant students.
  • Students with Disabilities (SWD): Students with Disabilities" includes all children who, because of permanent or temporary mental, physical or emotional handicaps, are in need of special education services. Section 504 students are not included.
  • Academically or Intellectually Gifted (AIG): AIG students are students who perform or show the potential to perform at substantially high levels of accomplishment when compared with others of their age, experience, or environment. Local Education Agencies determine identification criteria for AIG based on State Board of Education guidelines.

In the breakdown by student group where the number of students is too small (less than ten), data will not be displayed. This ensures that student information remains anonymous. In any group where the percentage of students is greater than 95%, the value will be displayed as 95%. For groups where the percentage of students is less than 5%, data will not be displayed because of federal privacy regulations.

Source: NCDPI, Accountability Services Division, Analysis and Reporting Section


School Performance Grade

Legislative Requirement

The North Carolina General Assembly enacted School Performance Grades for North Carolina Public schools. G.S. §115C-83.15 directs the State Board of Education to "award school achievement, growth, and performance scores and an associated performance grade as required by G.S. § 115C-12(9)c1 and calculated as provided".

Calculating the School Achievement Score

To calculate the School Achievement Score, the total number of points earned by a school is calculated using a composite approach. The total number of students meeting the standards, set in up to 10 different indicators, is divided by the total number of students included. The indicators include the following:

  • Students that score at or above proficient on annual mathematics end-of-grade (EOG) assessments in grades 3-8
  • Students that score at or above proficient on annual reading EOG assessments in grades 3-8
  • Students that score at or above proficient on annual science EOG assessment in grades 3-8
  • Students that score at or above proficient on Math I end of course (EOC) Assessment
  • Students that score at or above proficient on English II EOC Assessment
  • Students that score at or above proficient on Biology EOC Assessment
  • Students who complete Algebra II, Integrated Math III or Math III with a passing grade (Passing Math III)
  • Students who achieve the minimum score required for admission into a constituent institution of the University of North Carolina on a nationally normed test of college readiness (The ACT assessment)
  • Students enrolled in Career and Technical Education courses who meet the standard when scoring Silver, Gold or Platinum levels on a nationally normed test of workplace readiness (ACT WorkKeys assessment)
  • Students who graduate within four years of entering high school (4-year Cohort Graduation Rate)

Business rules regarding how students are included in these indicators and what the standards for meeting the indicators are can be found on the Accountability Services webpage.

Calculating Growth Score

North Carolina has partnered with SAS Institute Inc. to produce a School-wide Accountability Growth measure. All EOG (math, English language arts, and science) and EOC (Math I, English II, and Biology) scores are included in the EVAAS School-wide Accountability Growth measure. A composite index score is generated in the EVAAS system, and for School Performance Grades it is converted to a 100-point scale and given a designation. These designations will be 1) Exceeds Expected Growth, 2) Meets Expected Growth, or 3) Does Not Meet Expected Growth.

Some schools may not have a designation because they do not administer assessments that are included in the growth measure, or they do not have enough students taking the assessment to obtain a growth measure. More details on the growth model and other informational tools are available through the EVAAS public reporting site ncdpi.sas.com/.

In addition, EVAAS uses the growth measure and its associated standard error to calculate the school-level EOG math and reading indices. These indices are converted to a 100-point scale for use in the School Performance Grades.

Calculating Final Score and Grade

In order to calculate the final score and grade for a school, the School Achievement Score is combined with the Growth Score. Achievement is worth 80% of the grade, and growth is worth 20%. After combining these 2 values the score is placed on a 15-point scale:

A: 85-100 points
B: 70-84 points
C: 55-69 points
D: 40-54 points
F: Less than 40 points

In addition to the final score and grade, schools containing any grades K-8 that administer math and English language arts/reading assessments are also given separate scores and grades based on the achievement and growth of the math results and English language arts/reading results using the same formula and scale as the overall School Performance Grades.

Schools may be designated with an A+NG if after being assigned an “A” using the school performance grade calculations, the school does not demonstrate significant gaps between subgroups that exceeds the state gap on achievement/graduation rates.

Additional information regarding School Performance Grades can be found on the Accountability Services webpage.

Source: Accountability Services Division, Analysis and Reporting Section


The ACT

The ACT is administered to Grade 11 students. The ACT consists of four subject tests (English, Reading, Math, and Science) plus an additional Writing component. The four subject tests make up the Composite Score for the ACT. Students must have taken all four subject tests to receive a Composite Score. For accountability reporting purposes, a minimum Composite Score of 17 is displayed for the percent of students meeting the expected level of attainment (proficient). A Composite Score of 17 is the University of North Carolina (UNC) System's minimum requirement for admission. Additionally, on the reporting website, the percent of students meeting the ACT college-readiness benchmarks on each of the subject tests is reported along with total percent of benchmarks met.

Students who meet eligibility requirements have an opportunity to take the College- and-Career Readiness Alternate Assessment or the NCEXTEND1 Grade 11 alternate assessments. Students taking these assessments are not included in the calculation of this measure for performance reporting. They are included in participation. More details on the ACT are available at www.act.org/products/k-12-act-test/.


SUBTEST BENCHMARK
English 18
Math 22
Reading 22
Science 23
Writing 7

Source: NCDPI Accountability Services Division, Analysis and Reporting Section


ACT WorkKeys

The ACT WorkKeys performance measure is administered to students who are identified as Career and Technical Education (CTE) Concentrators. CTE Concentrators are students who complete 4 units of CTE credit in a career cluster, with at least one credit in a Level 2 course. The ACT WorkKeys consists of 3 subtests (Applied Math, Locating Information, and Reading for Information). Students can earn ACT's National Career Readiness Certificate (NCRC). Certificates are awarded at the Platinum, Gold, Silver, and Bronze level. For accountability reporting purposes, a minimum NCRC of Silver is required to meet the expected level of attainment (proficient). The results of the ACT WorkKeys assessments are used in accountability reporting when the student graduates from high school. Reporting this measure shows the percent of graduates that are CTE Concentrators who earned a Silver or better certificate on the ACT WorkKeys assessment. More details on ACT WorkKeys are available at www.act.org/products/workforce-act-workkeys/.

Source: NCDPI Accountability Services Division, Analysis and Reporting Section


Passing Math III

This indicator is the measure of student success in higher-level math courses. This indicator measures the number of graduates, starting with the 9th grade cohort entering in 2009–10, who have earned credit in a designated math course. Credit can be obtained by taking and passing one of the following courses; Algebra II, Integrated Math III, or Math III.

For accountability reporting purposes, this indicator is measured by counting the number of graduates who have taken and passed the defined higher level math course divided by the number of students who graduated and are eligible to be included in the calculation. This measure includes all graduates, except those in the Occupational Course of Study (OCS) who do not have an opportunity to take any of these higher-level math courses due to the nature of their education track.


Cohort Graduation Rate

The graduation rate reported here complies with the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) federal education law.

Since July 2005, all 50 states have signed the National Governors Association's Graduation Counts Compact on State High School Graduation Data. In the compact, governors agreed to take steps to implement a standard, four-year adjusted cohort graduation rate. States agree to calculate the graduation rate by dividing the number of on-time graduates in a given year by the number of first-time entering ninth graders four years earlier. Graduates are defined as those receiving a high school diploma. The denominator can be adjusted for transfers in and out of the system, and data systems track individual students with a longitudinal student unit record data system.

In the breakdown by student group where the number of students is too small (less than ten), a N/A (not available) is displayed. This ensures that student information remains anonymous. In any group where the percentage of students is greater than 95%, the value will be displayed as 95%. For groups where the percentage of students is less than 5%, data will not be displayed because of federal privacy regulations.

For more information on North Carolina's cohort graduation rate, please see the NCDPI's webpage: www.ncpublicschools.org/accountability/reporting/cohortgradrate

Source: NCDPI Accountability Services Division, Analysis and Reporting Section

Read to Achieve

Source data for Read to Achieve data are available from the Accountability test coordinator for each district or charter school. The test coordinator is listed in EDDIE (http://apps.schools.nc.gov/pls/apex/f?p=125:1:) under the staff role of “Accountability”.

Participation Targets

For Participation Targets the reported student groups are:

  • All Students (School as a Whole);
  • American Indian;
  • Asian;
  • Black;
  • Hispanic;
  • Pacific Islander;
  • Two or More Races;
  • White;
  • Economically Disadvantaged Students;
  • Limited English Proficient Students;
  • Students With Disabilities; and
  • Academically and Intellectually Gifted.

Most schools will not have all subgroups represented at their school. A student can be in as few as one group (All Students) or a student could be in as many as six student groups (including the All Students group). LEAs are held to the same participation targets for students that are established for schools. For elementary and middle schools (grades 3-8) participation targets include 95 percent participation in:

  • End-of-grade English language art/reading or alternate assessments;
  • End-of-grade mathematics or alternate assessments;
  • End-of-grade science or alternate assessments;
  • Current year end-of-course assessments;

For high schools (grades 9-12) participation targets include 95 percent participation:

  • On the English II End-of-Course or alternate assessments for students in 10th grade;
  • On the Math I End-of-Course or alternate assessments for students in 10th grade;
  • On the Biology End-of-Course or alternate assessments for students in 11th grade;
  • In current year end-of-course assessments;
  • On the ACT assessment;
  • On the ACT WorkKeys assessment;

Beginning in 2013-14 the 95% participation expectation for the ACT assessment will be measured on the all students group only. The ACT is only administered on 2 days with no further opportunity to make up the assessment, therefore, the US Education Department (USED) granted North Carolina permission to only measure the all students group. All other sstudent group participation will be reported but only the all students group will be used to measure participation targets for the ACT.

Prior to 2015-16, Annual Measurable Objective (AMO) targets were required by the USED. As a result of the passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act, in December 2015, states are not required to report out targets for proficiency during the transition to the new law’s requirement, beginning in 2017-18.

More details regarding participation targets are available on the Accountability Services webpage.

Source: NCDPI, Accountability Services Division, Analyis and Reporting Section